Beautiful People Parental Edition — Lennox (Again)

The Beautiful People link-up is so much fun!  If you don’t know, the link-up is to help writers get to know their characters better via the list of questions provided each month.

I’m featuring Lennox again (from my steampunk-ish story) because readers liked him last time, and because I think it would be weird to switch characters for this group of questions.

Here’s a picture of Lennox:

And here are this month’s questions!

Overall, how good is their relationship with their parents?  Lennox was close to his parents and grew closer to his mother after his father died of influenza (when Lennox was 15).  They all had the occasional disagreement, of course, but nothing that divided the family permanently.  In fact, if someone insults his family or especially his mother, Lennox is apt to start a fight.

“I will not hear a word said against my mother.  Not even by you, sir.”

(Talking to his grandfather)

Do they know both their biological parents? If not, how do they cope with this loss/absence, and how has it affected their life?  Yes, he knows them.  He grew up with them, and he had a happy childhood.

How did their parents meet?  His mother was an aristocratic daughter; his father was an artist.  They met when the artist was commissioned to paint a portrait, either for their family or a friend’s family.  The artist and the lady fell in love, and when her family objected, they eloped and lived on the continent for their entire married life.

How would they feel if they were told “you’re turning out like your parent(s)”?  Lennox would be more offended by the fact that someone considered this an insult than by the remark itself.  If someone did not mean it as an insult, he would definitely be pleased by the compliment.

What were your character’s parents doing when they were your character’s age?  Raising him, with the father trying to support the family by painting for aristocratic families on the continent.

Is there something they adamantly disagree on?  Lennox’s mother taught him etiquette as a child/teenager (which he did not see the use of) and also how to play the piano—which he hated.  His mother persisted, however, and he finally learned to play in spite of himself.

What did the parent(s) find hardest about raising your character?  Probably the I-have-no-idea-what-I’m-doing malady that strikes all first-time parents, and supporting the family on low income/living economically.  They were poor, but they managed.

What’s his most vivid memory with their parental figure(s)?  He remembers running around on the Italian hillsides while his father painted.  Sometimes watching his father, and sometimes (as Lennox got older) learning to paint himself.  His most vivid memory of his mother, however, is from when he was much older and had earned a fellowship at Cambridge.  The money it brought was enough to support them both, and he vividly remembers her doing little things around their house, such as cleaning and cooking and sewing, while he studied in the evenings.

What was your character like as a baby/toddler?  Lennox was mobile, always exploring, and touching/grabbing whatever caught his interest.  His mother kept a close eye on him, because he would be crawling or toddling out the open door every time she turned around.  Little Lennox was also generally cheerful and easygoing, though if his will was crossed when he wanted something strongly, he would throw tantrums.

Why and how did the parents choose your character’s name?  “Lennox” was actually the mother’s maiden surname.  She gave it to her son in memory of the life and family she had lost.  While she never really regretted eloping to marry her beloved, she did regret their stubbornness and rashness—because perhaps, with time, the minds of her family would have softened to the match.  The name was also a small way of honoring her family.

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14 thoughts on “Beautiful People Parental Edition — Lennox (Again)

  1. I like the reason you’ve given for your character’s name. It feels like a real reason, and explains the slightly unusual name. I keep thinking of Mary Lennox from The Secret Garden!

    • Christine Eyre says:

      Thanks! I actually borrowed the idea of giving the maiden name as the Christian name from Wuthering Heights. Y’know, I named Lennox first, and then realized he shares a name with a literary character! I think “Lennox” is an aristocratic name, which is why I as the author picked it for the family he’s named for. 🙂

      Thanks for stopping by and commenting!

    • Christine Eyre says:

      Thank you! I love creating detailed character personalities!

      Thanks for reading and commenting!

    • Christine Eyre says:

      YES IT IS! Rather fits a writer, don’t you think? 🙂

      Thank you! I haven’t blogged much about him and his story yet, but you can find more in the last BP I did, and in a post called “The Art of Storytelling: Create Your Compass.”

      Oh, how neat that you’re writing a steampunk story too! Thanks for the good wishes for mine!

      Also, thanks for stopping by and commenting!

    • Christine Eyre says:

      Thank you! Seriously, you made my day remembering my character and thinking him awesome! And Lennox’s parents definitely set examples that shaped his character, so he owes a lot to both of them.

      Thanks for stopping by and commenting!

    • Christine Eyre says:

      Thank you! Heh, actually, I dubbed the story “Steampunk” before I understood what that genre term really meant. Then I did proper research. 🙂 My story is actually a cross between social sci-fi and hard sci-fi, but set in the late Victorian years. I’ll give the story a working title eventually. 🙂

      Thank you for providing a link to your post! And thank you for stopping by and commenting!

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